Operation Ichi-Go

WWII: Victory Over Japan

East Asia 1944.1204

Operation Ichi-Go

World War II, Pacific War, Second Sino-Japanese War (4 December 1944)

Historical Map of East Asia & the Western Pacific

In early 1944, the US had started preparing airfields in southeast China for B29 bomber raids on Japan. The Japanese responded with Operation Ichi-Go, a general offensive to capture the air bases and open a land route to Indochina. Although Ichi-Go succeeded, by this stage the US bombers were able to relocate to the Marianas and raid Japan from there.

Main Events

Operation Ichi-Go

In a bid to open a land route to French Indochina and capture American-used air bases in southeast China, the Japanese launch Operation Ichi-Go against the Republic of China. In the first phase, the Japanese secure the Pinghan Railway connecting Wuhan to Beiping (Beijing); in the second, they move south from Wuhan, conquering large tracts of territory in Hunan and Guangxi provinces and displacing the US air bases there. Overall the operation is successful, with the Japanese losing about 100,000 dead to more than 480,000 Chinese military and 500,000 Chinese civilian casualties.

US XXI Bomber Command in Marianas makes inital raids on Truk, Iwo Jima and Japan

US secures Leyte

Second East Turkestan Republic

Following the Soviet-supported Ili Rebellion in northern Xinjiang, Republic of China, Turkic rebel groups declare the creation of the second East Turkestan Republic in Khulja. Ali Khan Ture, Marshal of the Ili National Army, is elected as president. With Soviet military assistance, the rebels quickly take control of the Ili, Tarbagatay, and Altay districts.

Operation Extended Capital

In Operation Capital, the British 11th East African and 20th Indian Divisions cross the Chindwin into Japanese-occupied Burma at Kalewa and Mawlaik while the 19th Indian Division does so at Sittaung. Facing little Japanese resistance, the British plan is expanded on 18 December to become Operation Extended Capital - a full-scale advance on Meiktila. Coupled with landings in the Arakan and a US-led Chinese push from the north, the Allies reconnect the Burma Road on 27 January 1945, cross the Irrawaddy in February, and capture Mandalay and Meiktila the following month.

About this map